BACH: UNDER THE INFLUENCE – DOUGLAS HOLLICK (RVRCD 121)

£10.00

DOUGLAS HOLLICK

Category:

Description

1 Magnificat II. Toni 6:51″
Matthias Weckmann 1616-1674
Primus versus à 5
Secundus versus à 4 Aug 2 Clavir
Tertius versus à 5
Quartus versus à 6
2 Canzon Dall istesso Tuono 2.22″
3 Erbarm dich mein,O Herre Gott
Heinrich Scheidermann 1596-1663
Versus
Versus auff 2 Cl
5.41″
4 Jesu, wollst uns weisen 1.25″
5 Passacaglia in D minor BuxWV 161
Dieterich Buxtehude 1637-1707
6.24″
6 Chorale Fantasia on Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ BuxWV 188 10.25″
7 Ciacona in D minor – 16 variations
Johann Pachelbel 1653-1706
6.15″
8 Christ lag in Todesbanden
Georg Böhm 1661-1733
5.30″
9 Chaconne
J C F Fischer 1665-1746
from Musicalisches Blümen-Büschlein Augsburg 1696
4.54″
10 An Wasserflüssen Babylon BWV 653
J S Bach 1685-1750
from Musicalisches Blümen-Büschlein Augsburg 1696
6.29″
11 Passacaglia & Fugue in C minor BWV 582
J S Bach 1685-1750
15.13″

NOTES

Matthias Weckmann was organist of the Jacobikirche in Hamburg during the final years of his life, and his four verse setting of the Magnificat plainsong chant is a fine example of his writing, reflecting his reputation as one of the greatest players of his time.

The chant is in the tenor of verse one, in the decorated top line of verse two, in the alto (played on a pedal four-foot reed) in verse three, and treated more freely in the final exuberant verse. Weckmann was a protégé of Schütz, a pupil of Giovanni Gabrieli, and a colleague of Froberger in Dresden before taking up the Hamburg post, thus having a wide knowledge of different styles of composition: from Germany, Italy and France through Froberger’s friendship with Louis Couperin. This breadth of experience he would have shared with colleagues in Hamburg, and of course with Buxtehude in nearby Lübreck. His little Canzon is a tour de force of playful counterpoint!

BIOGRAPHY

DOUGLAS HOLLICK

“Douglas Hollick is an acknowledged specialist in the field of early keyboard instruments and music,”

“and was the first Organ Scholar at Hull University, studying with Peter Hurford. He subsequently studied in Paris with Marie-Claire Alain, and in Amsterdam with Gustav Leonhardt. He has played widely in the UK and abroad, and teaches in Clare and Trinity Colleges Cambridge.”

REVIEWS